Executive Leadership Team


Dr. Douglas Causey

View CV.

Dr. Douglas Causey
Principal Investigator


Bio

Dr. Larry Hinzman

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Dr. Larry Hinzman
Research Director


Bio

Randy "Church" Kee

View CV.

Randy "Church" Kee Maj Gen USAF (Ret)
Executive Director

Bio




Supporting Leadership Team


Malla Kukkonen

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Malla Kukkonen
Education and Administrative Manager


Bio

Heather Paulsen

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Heather Paulsen
Finance Director



Bio






RESEARCHERS TEAM



Dr. Lilian "Lil" Alessa
Community-based Observing Network for Situational Awareness (CBON-SA) Lead

Bio

Dr. James G. Bellingham
Development of Propeller Driven Long Range Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (LRAUV) Lead

Bio

Rob Bochenek
Arctic Information Fusion Capability (AIFC) Researcher


Bio

Dr. Martin Cenek
Low Cost Wireless Remote Sensors Lead


Bio

Brian J. Conroy
Arctic Information Fusion Capability (AIFC) Researcher


Bio

Susan Hazlett
Arctic Education - Implementing the Arctic Strategy in Training Co-Lead

Bio

Rebecca Koskela
Arctic Information Fusion Capability Research Lead



Bio

Dr. Andy Mahoney
Identifying, Tracking, and Communicated Sea-Ice Hazards Lead


Bio

Leonid Naboyshchikov
Community-based Observing Network for Situational Awareness (CBONS-SA) Researcher

Bio

Captain Ralph H. Pundt
Arctic Education - Implementing the Arctic Strategy in Training Co-Lead

Bio

Dr. Tom Ravens
Arctic Oil Spill Modeling Co-Lead



Bio

Dr. Scott A. Socolofsky
Arctic Oil Spill Modeling Co-Lead



Bio

Eric Velte
Low Cost Wireless Remote Sensors Research Lead



Bio

Dr. Jinlun Zhang
High-Resolution Modeling of Arctic Sea Ice and Currents Lead


Bio





ADAC Fellows



Matthew Ahlrichs


Bio

James Matthews


Bio

Leif Hammes

Bio


Kyle Alvarado


Bio

Christina Hoy


Bio

Jessica Faust


Bio



Lonnie Young


Bio

Seth Campbell


Bio





Randy “Church” Kee, Maj Gen, USAF (Ret)
ADAC EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Randy "Church" Kee

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Randy "Church" Kee, Major General, USAF (ret) is Executive Director of the Arctic Domain Awareness Center of Excellence. He arrived to the University of Alaska in January 2016, following a 30-year career in the United States Air Force. General Kee was commissioned in 1985 through the Reserve Officer's Training Corps program at Oregon State University. The general has commanded at the squadron, group and wing levels, and served operationally in the Western Pacific, Southwest Asia, the Balkans and Afghanistan. The general has held a variety of staff assignments to include U.S. Transportation Command, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, and the U.S. Joint Staff in both Operations and Strategic Plans and Policy Directorates. He has also served as Vice Commander of the US Air Force‘s Global Air Mobility Operations Center. He has been a contributor on U.S. Arctic Strategy and Policy development, supported domain awareness technology development, and contributed to Defense Support to U.S. Federal agencies on several Arctic Search, Rescue and Humanitarian Assistance planning initiatives. Along with a Norwegian Director of Strategy, General Kee served as Co-Chair of the Multi-national Arctic Security Forces Roundtable. He culminated his military service as the Director of Strategy, Policy, Planning and Capabilities for U.S. European Command, Stuttgart Germany. General Kee is a command pilot and previously qualified navigator who has flown a variety of aircraft, with approximately 4,700 flight hours, including 700 in combat.

Dr. Larry Hinzman
RESEARCH DIRECTOR

Dr. Larry Hinzman

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Larry Hinzman is Vice Chancellor for Research and is Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Hinzman served as the Director of the UAF International Arctic Research Center from 2007 to 2015. Professor Hinzman‘s primary research interests involve permafrost hydrology. He has conducted hydrological and meteorological field studies in the Alaskan Arctic continuously for over 35 years while frequently collaborating on complementary research in the Russian and Canadian Arctic. His research efforts have involved characterizing and quantifying hydrological processes and their inter-dependence with climate and ecosystem dynamics. He has served as a member of the U.S. Polar Research Board and now serves as an Ex-Officio member of that board. He was the U.S. Representative to the International Permafrost Association and a member of the Universities Council on Water Resources. He served as co-chair of the U.S. National Science Foundation‘s study on the Arctic Freshwater Integration and as chief scientist for the U.S. Department of Energy‘s Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic). He has served on the U.S. SEARCH (Study of Environmental Arctic Change) Observing Change Panel, and the Alaska Governor‘s Subcabinet Economic Activities Technical Working Group. He currently serves on the International Advisory Board for the Korea Polar Research Institute, and for the Canadian Changing Cold Regions Network (CCRN). He is a member of the Scientific Steering Group for WRCP Climate and Cryosphere (CliC) program and is vice-chair of the International Sustained Arctic Observing Network (SAON). He is an Advisory Committee Member for the Alaska Center for Energy and the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS). Hinzman serves as the US delegate and vice-president of the International Arctic Science Committee. He is strongly committed to facilitating national and international partnerships to advance our understanding of the arctic system.

Dr. Douglas Causey
PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

Dr. Douglas Causey

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Douglas Causey, PhD is Principal Investigator of the Arctic Domain Awareness Center of Excellence, Senior Advisor on Arctic Policy to the Chancellor, Director of the Applied Environmental Research Center and the BEI Center for Strategic Projects and Research, and Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Alaska Anchorage. He arrived to UAA in June 2005 from Harvard University where he was Senior Fellow of the Kennedy School of Government and Senior Biologist at the Museum of Comparative Zoology. From 1995 - 2000, he represented the National Science Foundation at organizational meetings leading to the formation of the Arctic Council and was NSF‘s Arctic Representative during the Gore-Chernomyrdin negotiations on US-Russian Science Policy. An ecologist and evolutionary biologist by training, he has authored over one hundred ninety publications on topics as diverse as the biology of Arctic marine birds, high Arctic coastal systems, and bat-borne diseases. His research focuses on the environment alcorrelates of Arctic climate change, and he has published extensively on policy issues related to the Arctic environment, national security, and bioterrorism and public health.
Heather Paulsen
FINANCE DIRECTOR

Heather Paulsen

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Ms. Heather Paulsen is the Director of Grants and Contracts for Business Enterprise Institute and the Finance Director for the Arctic Domain Awareness. She is involved with all aspects of both entities fiscal operations and ensures compliance with federal and state regulations. She has dynamic executive leadership career in many multimillion dollar organizations (United States Air Force and a couple Fortune 500 companies), and has extensive management experience in areas of finance, operations, internal/external process improvement, and business development. Ms.Paulsen has over 15 years of experience in financial management and supervision with a record of success in restricted grant management, audit controls, financial and operations planning, contract negotiations, and partnering with higher and lower levels of administration.

Malla Kukkonen
Administrative and Communications Officer

Malla Kukkonen

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Ms. Malla Kukkonen serves as the Administrative and Communications Officer for ADAC. She joined the Center in early December 2016 following eight years of service with the State of Alaska. Her primary mission with ADAC is to provide Administrative and Communications support for the Center, including assistance in the management of all externally funded ADAC projects, planning of logistics for events, and development of content for ADAC publications, website, and other media outlets. Growing up at the Arctic Circle in Finland and spending time learning and studying resource management issues in several Arctic nations around the circumpolar north have shaped Ms. Kukkonen’s northern identity and knowledge about the rich cultures and peoples of the Arctic. Conducting social science research in diverse Alaska communities in collaboration with state and federal agency partners and Alaska Native Tribes have provided her unique insights into contemporary life in urban and rural Alaska communities. Most recently she worked as a co-Primary Investigator in a North Pacific Research Board (NPRB) funded project focused on studying the resilience and adaptive capacity of the community of Yakutat through the lens of subsistence. She was also the co-Principal Investigator in an Alaska Sustainable Salmon Fund (AKSSF) supported project focused on monitoring subsistence salmon harvests in two Lower Cook Inlet Communities. In addition, Ms. Kukkonen has several years of experience working with outreach and communications, most recently at the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. With a Master of Social Sciences in International Relations, she brings her hands-on research, project management and communications skills along with her international educational background to advance the development of the Center and the Department of Homeland Security Enterprise.

Rebecca Koskela
Arctic Information Fusion Capability Research Lead

Rebecca Koskela is the Executive Director of DataONE at the University of New Mexico. Rebecca has a background in both bioinformatics and high performance computing. Prior to this position, Rebecca was the Life Sciences Informatics Manager for Alaska INBRE and the Biostatistics and Epidemiology Core Manager for the Center for Alaska Native Health Research at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. At the Arctic Region Supercomputing Center she led the team evaluating the use of the semantic web, including focused ontologies for use as data integration tool for biological data including microarray data, molecular pathways, and protein profiling data at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Prior to that, she was a member of the senior management team of the Aventis Cambridge Genomics Center and manager of the Scientific Computing group in Cambridge, MA responsible for computing infrastructure, both hardware and software, for the global functional genomics organization including support for high-throughput sequencing and transcriptional profiling, molecular pathway analyses, and data integration. She was a bioinformatics specialist at the Mayo Clinic, director of informatics in the Department of Genetics at Stanford University and also worked at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory with the Dana Consortium for the Genetic Basis of Manic-Depression Illness. In addition to her bioinformatics experience, Rebecca specialized in system performance and analysis at Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Cray Research, Intel, and IBM.

Dr. Scott A. Socolofsky
Arctic Oil Spill Modeling Co-Lead

Dr. Scott Socolofsky is professor of Civil Engineering and Oceanography at Texas A&M University in College Station, TX. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1997 and 2001) and his B.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Colorado, Boulder (1994). Currently, Dr. Socolofsky is Division Head for Environmental, Water Resources, and Coastal Engineering in the Zachry Department of Civil Engineering at Texas A&M and is Associate Director of the Offshore Technology Research Center (OTRC). He is Associate Editor for the Journal of Hydraulic Engineering-ASCE and a member of the Technical Advisory Committee for the Subsea Dispersant Effectiveness Task Force of the American Petroleum Institute (API). Previously, he was chief scientist of the Gulf Integrated Spill Research (GISR) consortium, headquartered at Texas A&M and funded by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI). He was also Research Scientist at the University of Karlsruhe, Institute for Fluid Mechanics (2000-2002) and Director of the Ocean Engineering Program at Texas A&M University (2011-2014).

Brian J. Conroy
Arctic Information Fusion Capability (AIFC) Researcher

Brian Conroy has over 35 years of experience as a senior technology leader in Life Cycle Systems Engineering, Enterprise Information Technology (IT) Operations, and Engineering Program/Project Management. He is currently working for NOVA Corporation, a tribally owned company established by the Dine Development Corporation by the Navajo Nation Tribal Council. He has had a very successful and diverse career within the Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS). His career started as a Submarine Engineer and progressed to numerous Project Engineering challenges to include submarine maintenance and modernization, Special Projects, deploying Navy Bases and IT Network Design/Development. He was awarded the Navy‘s Meritorious Commendation and numerous Engineering Awards. His career advanced to that of a Naval Sea System Command Information Technology Division Director. In 2008, he took a position with DHS as the Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE) Enterprise Operations Director and then to a Deputy Executive Director within Customs and Border Protection (CBP). In this position his responsibilities included the deployment and sustainment of IT and Law Enforcement Technology as well as Special Projects development and integration.

Leonid Naboyshchikov
Community-based Observing Network for Situational Awareness (CBONS-SA) Researcher

Leonid Naboyshchikov is the lead analyst for Kestrel and is responsible for the development of new analytical processes, overarching analytical support for various mission sets including counter narcotics, security, and humanitarian assistance, as well as research and development of new technologies and product development. Moreover, he has served in the role of a field engineer–providing testing, support, and execution of experimental and production deployments where needed with Kestrel‘s array of FIST and related technologies. Mr. Naboyshchikov is a subject matter expert on dark network operations, counter-terrorism and counterinsurgency tactics, nonproliferation and crisis management. He also has extensive knowledge in social network analysis methodologies and programs, link and relational analysis, socio-behavioral analysis, data visualization, data fusion techniques, and data analysis. Mr. Naboyshchikov received a B.A. in Political Science from American Jewish University, as well as an M.A. in Counter Terrorism and Non-Proliferation Studies from Monterey Institute of International Studies. EXPERIENCE Mr. Naboyshchikov is a subject matter expert on dark network operations, counter-terrorism and counterinsurgency tactics, nonproliferation and crisis management. He also has extensive knowledge in social network analysis methodologies and programs, link and relational analysis, socio-behavioral analysis, data visualization, data fusion techniques, and data analysis.

Dr. Jinlun Zhang
High-Resolution Modeling of Arctic Sea Ice and Currents Lead

Dr. Jinlun Zhang earned his B.S. in shipbuilding and mechanical engineering at Harbin Engineering University, M.S. in ship fluid dynamics and ocean engineering at China Ship Scientific Research Center, and PhD in sea ice and ocean dynamics at the Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College. He joined the Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington in 1994. A senior principal oceanographer, he is interested in quantifying and understanding polar climate change. He investigates the properties of polar ice-ocean systems by developing and using large-scale sea ice and ocean models such as the Pan-arctic Ice-Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS). He also studies the impact of changes in sea ice on marine planktonic ecosystems by developing and using coupled biophysical models such as the Biology-Ice-Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (BIOMAS).

Dr. Tom Ravens
Arctic Oil Spill Modeling Co-Lead

Dr. Ravens also serves as the Associate Dean for Research and Professor of Civil Engineering in UAA‘s College of Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1997) and his M.E., B.E., and B.A. in Engineering Sciences from Dartmouth College (1883). His research is focused on field, laboratory and modeling work in coastal processes and renewable energy (specifically hydrokinetic energy). His coastal processes research includes studies of hydrodynamics (waves and currents), sediment transport, flooding, water quality, coastal erosion and geomorphic change in Arctic settings.

Dr. Lilian "Lil" Alessa
Community-based Observing Network for Situational Awareness (CBON-SA) Lead

Dr. Alessa is ADAC's Community-based Observing Network for Situational Awareness (CBON-SA) Lead and "human-in-the-loop" expert. Dr. Alessa is President's Professor of Resilient Landscapes at the University of Idaho and Director of the Center for Resilient Communities at UI. She earned Ph.D.s from the University of British Columbia (Cell biology and Cognitive psychology) and joined the faculty of University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) where she founded and ran the Resilience and Adaptive Management (RAM) group for 10 years. Dr. Alessa specializes in the study and application of community-based observing networks and systems, complex adaptive systems, social-ecological systems, and community resilience. Dr. Alessa serves on the National Science Foundation's Advisory Committee on Environmental Research and Education (AC-ERE) and co-authored the report on "America's Future: Environmental Research and Education for a Thriving Century" http://www.nsf.gov/geo/ere/ereweb/ac-ere/ac-ere_thriving_century.pdf. Dr. Alessa has authored close to 100 papers on social-ecological systems, adaptation, community-based observing and security and defense prediction for the linked environmental and social emergence of conflict, cooperation and critical events.

Dr. Martin Cenek
Low Cost Wireless Remote Sensors Lead

Dr. Cenek is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA). In 2011, he received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Portland State University in Artificial Intelligence and Theory track. His current research is in the areas of complex and adaptive systems, agent and individual based modeling, artificial intelligence and machine learning, non-linear systems, social network analysis and complex networks. He is a director of UAA's ICAN Lab (Artificial Intelligence, Complex Systems, Adaptive Systems and Networks Lab) and Software Engineering Lab. His research was funded by the National Science Foundation, Department of Homeland Security, International Relief and Development fund.

Dr. James G. Bellingham
Development of Propeller Driven Long Range Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (LRAUV) Lead

James G. Bellingham is a pioneer in the development of autonomous marine robots. He is the founding Director of the Center of Marine Robotics at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).Jim founded the Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Laboratory at MIT (1988), and co-founded Bluefin Robotics (1997). He was Director of Engineering and Chief Technologist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) before coming to Woods Hole. He has participated and led numerous research expeditions including to the Arctic and Antarctic. Jim received an S.B., S.M., and Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Susan Hazlett
Arctic Education - Implementing the Arctic Strategy in Training Co-Lead

Susan Hazlett received her baccalaureate degree from University of Maryland and did her graduate studies at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, receiving a master's degree in professional communication and advancing to candidacy in marine science. She was also a student in UAF's Resilience and Adaptation program (RAP) program. She is a member of the American Academy for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), Sigma Xi, and the Explorer's Club. Before joining the faculty at Maine Maritime Academy, she worked for the US Geological Survey as a GIS analyst and as a biologist. Her main interests are in glaciers and in marine protected areas, especially in the arctic. She has also worked part time on cruise ships for a number of years, both in Alaska and the rest of the world.

Eric Velte
Low Cost Wireless Remote Sensors Research Lead

Mr. Velte is the Chief Technical Officer of ASRC Federal Mission Solutions and is responsible for a team of engineers and computer scientist who tackle some of the world's toughest challenges. From Command and Control systems to large footprint sensors, he and his team have developed and delivered over 90 different software baselines to over 100 domain awareness and warfighting platforms. Mr. Velte currently serves as the head of AFMS's Arctic Strategy, responsible for policy research, systems and software development in support of Arctic operations, and collaborative Arctic-focused research. Mr. Velte received his B.A. from Ursinus College in 1992. He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society, a number of professional warfighter-focused communities, and was previously Chief Scientist of CSC's Maritime Display Systems team.

Captain Ralph H. Pundt
Arctic Education - Implementing the Arctic Strategy in Training Co-Lead

Captain Ralph H. Pundt, Key Researcher, Maine Maritime Academy Captain Pundt holds a USCG Master Unlimited Tonnage & Oceans license, and is a 1977 graduate of Maine Maritime Academy (MMA) Castine Maine where he has been a full time member of the faculty since 1999. Captain Pundt is a favorite among his colleagues and enjoys sharing his maritime knowledge and skills while training undergraduate students on campus and as a training officer aboard the Academy's TV State of Maine for many years. Captain Pundt is a sought after graduate program, industry, and Continuing Education lecturer and instructor both domestically and internationally in subjects as various as Tanker Operations, Maritime Security Operations, worldwide Navigation and Pollution control, all hazards training and emergency response. After serving aboard a variety of vessels on global itineraries for 15 years Captain Punt became Master of the MV Richard G Matthiesen a 32000 Dwt Clean Product Tanker on worldwide trade for Military Sea Lift Command from 1992-1998. Voyages aboard that ship included Arctic and Antarctic trips where he became familiar with the challenges of Ice Navigation in Polar Waters. Captain Pundt served for six years as the head of MMA's Academic Department of Marine Transportation and is also the co-founder of International Maritime Security Network, a PA based maritime security training and USCG approved maritime security course provider. In February 2015, he was a member of the US delegation to the IMO subcommittee on the Human Element in Training and Watchkeeping where he served as a training advisor for Ice Navigation. Captain Pundt and his wife Maureen live in Brooksville, Maine.Dr. Eric Klein, Postdoctoral Research Scientist, Department of Biological

Dr. Andy Mahoney
Identifying, Tracking, and Communicated Sea-Ice Hazards Lead

Dr. Andy Mahoney is a research assistant professor of geophysics at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and has been studying sea ice in the both hemispheres for over 15 years. He earned his PhD in Geophysics at UAF studying landfast sea ice dynamics and completed two postdocs at the University of Colorado and the University of Otago before returning to UAF to join the faculty of the Geophysical Institute. He has participated and in and led extensive field campaigns in the Arctic and Antarctic including leadership of a 9-month, over-winter field campaign in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, as well as operational research in support of an over-ice fuel delivery to Nome, Alaska. In particular, Dr. Mahoney has extensive experience studying sea ice in coastal waters where he has used research tools ranging from satellites and aircraft to ice augers and dogsleds.

Rob Bochenek
Arctic Information Fusion Capability (AIFC) Researcher

Rob has been developing data management and cyber infrastructure solutions for research programs and organizations for the past fifteen years. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan with a degrees in aerospace engineering and mathematics. Early in his career Rob spent five years at the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council leading the data management team in processing, documenting and organizing the informational products produced from the scientific research funded to understand and monitor the ecological effects of the oil spill. Based upon that experience, Rob founded Axiom in 2006 to develop more generalized and holistic solutions for data management. He specializes in scientific geo-spatial information management with applications to physical/biological modeling and decision support data warehouse knowledge systems.

Matthew Ahlrichs

As a graduate student, Matthew Ahlrichs assumes many responsibilities as an ADAC Fellow. Besides pursuing a master’s degree in Civil Engineering, Matt is assisting in the development and testing of an autonomous sensor network for remote areas. His involvement in this project addresses concerns regarding the cumulative environmental impact associated with this network. To accomplish these goals, Matt is developing a model that will estimate the number of sensors that will be needed and complete a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). A LCA is aimed at quantifying the impact of these sensors on the environments they are looking to monitor and propose more sustainable solutions without sacrificing performance. Outside of his obligations at UAA, Matt can be found playing outside, cooking, and playing guitar.

James Matthews

While being an undergraduate student, James Matthews assists the Arctic Domain Awareness Center (ADAC) as a valued ADAC Fellow. He is currently a university senior pursuing a civil engineering degree at UAA and is looking to specialize in Water Resources Engineering. Over the years he has been fortunate enough to have been involved in a number of engineering internships as well as plenty of leadership positions at the university. Before his involvement with ADAC James had engineering experience with the Alaska Department of Transportation and McGoey, Hauser & Edsall, a consulting engineering firm in Matamoras, PA. He also co-founded and co-owned a landscaping business that is still prospering and growing today. Having joined ADAC in March of 2016, James has complete literary reviews on published journals and used expertise to provide insight and notions of innovation for the department. He has worked under the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to address Arctic Incidents of National Significance (IONS) and worked with the US Coast Guard (USCG) to develop ideas to increase response time and reduce risk in the Arctic with regards to traveling by sea. In addition, he has taken on responsibilities to handle social media platforms for ADAC as well as help out the center in other responsibilities as needed. Through his fellowship with ADAC, James was granted and participated in an internship with ARTEC Alaska over the summer of 2016. This opportunity immersed him in work involving Over and Above (O&A) projects contracted out by the Air Force concerning 16 radar sites around Alaska. By preparing purchase requests for equipment and supplies needed, flying to Fort Yukon to oversee a new Fast Plant system installation, and being exposed to several engineering disciplines, he discovered the associated challenges that come with performing engineering and construction in the Arctic. James plans on pursuing a career with the Department of Homeland Security upon graduation. When asked about his intentions on pursuing such a career James stated, "My career goals include performing quality work and research to better the environment and keep the public safe and worry free. The Department of Homeland Securities' (DHS) mission to keep the homeland safe, secure and resistant against terrorism and other hazards are undertakings I not only support, but that I value highly and would like to be a continue to part of. I believe that by offering my skill set to the DHS, I can help them as department make decisions and address issues in such a way as to not only hold true to this mission statement, but help mold me into an individual with a strong sense of integrity who is dedicated to helping his neighbors before himself."

Leif Hammes

Leif Hammes is a graduate student at UAA pursing a MS in Civil Engineering. Having completed a BS in Geology, he is interested in coastal erosion and hydro-geomorphic processes. His thesis focuses on a coastal erosion model along permafrost coasts. After spending several years away, Leif was happy to return to Alaska. He and his wife had their first child, a baby girl, in September 2016. In his spare time Leif enjoys hiking, camping, traveling and exploring Alaska’s wild places.

Kyle Alvarado

Kyle Alvarado’s undergraduate studies as a Mechanical Engineering student at UAA is part of pursuing his childhood desire to find a career as an Aerospace Engineer; focusing on Research and Development of machine designs. An advanced Arctic Engineering course has given him a unique insight on the challenges and solutions of cold regions’ engineering. He has a natural affinity for cold environment machine design for improving safety and quality. In collaboration with various professors and researchers, Kyle spent his summer of 2016 helping prepare the ADAC presentations for the Arctic Chinook. Kyle is eager to gain further experience in the international pursuit of safety in the Arctic.

Christina Hoy

Christina was admitted to the ADAC Program Fall 2015 as a first year undergrad. Currently studying Civil Engineering, she plans on concentrating on Environmental and Water Resource Engineering. With opportunities granted by ADAC, Christina spent eight weeks participating in the Maritime Security Center’s Summer Research Institute hosted by Stephens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. She worked on a multidiscipline research team focused on underwater acoustics and increasing situational awareness in remote maritime locations. Upon completion of the program, Christina and her team designed a self-sustaining hydrophone system fitted with a satellite system to report data recordings remotely to an email address. Christina also studied port security and operations, hoping to focus on this field specifically later in her college career. In her time at the University of Alaska Anchorage, she has been an active member of the UAA Chapter of the Society of Women Engineers where she holds the president position.

Jessica Faust

Jessica Faust joined the ADAC CDG Fellowship in January of 2017. She is a graduate student of the Department of Biological Sciences at UAA, where she is examining the population dynamics, distribution, and habitat association of Little Brown Bats. In 2015, Jessica spent 12 weeks collecting ultrasonic acoustic data throughout Southcentral Alaska and Prince William Sound, primarily based out of Cordova. Her master’s thesis analyzes the ultrasonic recordings to determine habitat preference and potential colony locations of bats. Jessica graduated from Willamette University, in 2012 with a Bachelor of Arts in Biology, and will begin pursuing her doctorate in the fall of 2017. She is interested in a teaching career in balance with research and community outreach.

Lonnie Young

Lonnie Young is currently studying Electrical Engineering at UAA. He has been a part of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers for thirteen years and plans on concentrating his studies on power and distribution to compliment his electrical knowledge. Lonnie is currently the chair of IEEE (The institute of electrical and Electronics Engineers) student branch. In his spare time, he likes to downhill ski, hike as well as travel the globe.

Seth Campbell

Seth Campbell is a graduate student at UAA pursuing a MS in Civil Engineering specializing in Water Resources. Seth graduated from UAA with a BS in Mechanical Engineering in 2014. Seth became interested in Water Resources engineering after working with the UAA chapter of Engineers Without Borders from 2010-2012. As an ADAC fellow, Seth has participated in the Arctic Incidences of National Significance conference and is working to develop an ice indexing system for the Great Lakes as part of ICECON. Seth is keenly interested in hydrology and the role of sea ice in climate change. In his spare time, he enjoys playing guitar, hiking, reading, and biking.